• Instructional Resources

    The following resources are useful in support of History-Social Science instruction.

    Key Documents

    • California History-Social Science Framework.  The State Board of Education adopted the History-Social Science Framework on July 14, 2016. Curriculum frameworks provide guidance to educators, parents, and publishers, to support implementing California content standards.
    • Revitalizing K-12 Civic Learning In California: A Blueprint For Action. The product of the California Task Force on K-12 Civic Learning, this Blueprint addresses four key areas for schools and students in grades K-12: Curriculum, Instructional Practices, and Resources; Professional Learning; Community and Business Partnerships; and Student Assessment and School Accountability. It outlines a plan of action for students, teachers, administrators, business and community leaders, courts, and local government and elected officials to take immediate action to improve civic learning in all California schools and communities.

    Women's Suffrage march, New York City, 1912

    "History must share with reading, writing and arithmetic first rank as the most important subjects in the curriculum. Understanding the issues on which citizens of a republic are expected to vote is impossible without an understanding of the past." --Walter Cronkite


    Useful Resources

    • California History-Social Science Project.  CHSSP is one of nine California Subject Matter Projects that provide high quality professional development for educators at the pre-kindergarten through post-secondary levels. Participation in CHSSP fosters the development of knowledgeable history-social science educators who take responsibility for the development and implementation of standards-based comprehensive and sequential programs in history-social science at every educational level. CHSSP Regional Sites host activities that are designed to deepen teachers' knowledge of history, geography, civics, and economics, and enhance teachers' instructional strategies in the teaching of those disciplines.
    • Stanford History Education Group (SHEG).  SHEG offers a range of professional development options for teachers across grade levels. They developed and host Reading Like a Historian curriculum that engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents designed for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions by employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Additionally, SHEG is developing new assessments for history called Beyond the Bubble. 
    • California Historical Society (CHS).  CHS is a 140-year-old, non-profit organization with a mission to inspire and empower people to make California's richly diverse past a meaningful part of their contemporary lives. The CHS Collection represents the environmental, economic, social, political, and cultural heritage of the entire state, including materials from outside California that contribute to a greater understanding of the state and its people.
    • Facing History and Ourselves. Facing History and Ourselves provides educational materials to support civic responsibility, tolerance, and social action for young people.
    • American Historical Association (AHA). AHA is the largest professional organization in the United States devoted to the study and promotion of history and historical thinking. AHA brings together historians from all specializations and professions, embracing their breadth, variety, and ever-changing activity.
    • California Museum.  The California Museum — home of the California Hall of Fame — engages, educates, and enlightens people about California’s rich history and unique contributions to the world through ideas, innovation, the arts, and culture. Through interactive and innovative experiences, the museum inspires men, women, and children to pursue the California dream and make a mark on history.
    • National History Education Clearinghouse. NCHS has a threefold mission: to develop and provide teachers with curricular materials that will engage students in exciting explorations of U.S. and World History; professional development for K-12 history teachers; and to collaborate with schools in building their history curricula.
    • National Center for History in the Schools (NCHS) NCHS has a threefold mission: to develop and provide teachers with curricular materials that will engage students in exciting explorations of U.S. and World History; professional development for K-12 history teachers; and to collaborate with schools in building their history curricula.
    • Historical Thinking Project’s Historical Thinking Concepts.  The Historical Thinking Project works with six distinct but closely interrelated historical thinking concepts.
    • Historical Thinking Matters.  Historical Thinking Matters focuses on key topics in U.S. history, designed to teach students how to critically read primary sources and how to critique and construct historical narratives.